• DCEmu Homebrew Emulation & Theme Park News

    The DCEmu the Homebrew Gaming and Theme Park Network is your best site to find Hacking, Emulation, Homebrew and for the first time Theme Park News and also Beers Wines and Spirit Reviews and Finally Marvel Cinematic Univers News. If you would like us to do reviews or wish to advertise/write/post articles in any way at DCEmu then use our Contact Page for more information. DCEMU Gaming is mainly about video games -
  • souLLy

    by Published on February 2nd, 2011 12:19
    1. Categories:
    2. Nintendo Wii News,
    3. DCEmu Reviews

    Wlip Solderless Wii Modkit
    Review by: souLLy
    Manufacturer: Wlip
    Site: N/A
    Price: 24.95€


    Overview: Wlip is an adaptor that has been designed especially to install any Modchip in your Wii in a faster and easy way and without damage for your console, because there is no need for welding. You can install it yourself without any technical procedure in a few minutes,

    There are two models of Wlip: Model A is used for normal leg Wiis and Model B works with cut leg Wiis. For D2C chips there are not any Wlip yet, but we are working on it. Wlip can support any Modchips models except the ones for D2C.

    Quality/Usability : I've wanted to get my Wii chipped for quite some time, the thought of some tasty Gamecube homebrew and the possibility of future Wii homebrew is a very tempting proposition. If you're like me and 99% of the population though that isn't too handy with a soldering iron, you're left with very little choice, send your beloved console along with a chunk of cash to some anonymous person who advertises on an Internet forum- not for the feint hearted, or buy a Wlip.

    A Wlip is a small plastic device that clips onto your Wii's motherboard that you can fit a Wii modchip into, essentially a Wii modchip that doesn't require any soldering! Not only that but if you decide you don't want to use that chip any more you can just as easily take the Wlip out of your console with the minimum of fuss or risk. On paper then it's a very enticing proposition. At the moment it's only for earlier model Wiis; people who need D2C chips are out of luck at the moment, the official Wlip site says they're on the way though so keep an eye out if you're interested.

    The modchip I chose was the Wiinja Deluxe, I grabbed mine from Futura Videogames which is an official reseller of the Wiinja chip so I could be certain it was genuine. At £23 including delivery it was fairly reasonable but be sure to hunt around for a good deal. To open your Wii you'll need a tri-wing screwdriver, I grabbed mine from DealExtreme for about 75p with free delivery, bargain!

    Installation : Take your Wlip and insert your modchip into the space provided, it should be a reassuringly snug fit. Next you need to disassemble your Wii. This was no great problem, there's a number of guides around that help you find where all the screws are hidden, after that it's a few screws inside and disconnecting two ribbon cables - if you're careful you can do all of this without doing any cosmetic damage to your case.

    Next firmly push your Wlip over a chip on the exposed Wii board, I watched the video on the official Wlip site to be certain it was in the right place, although it is obvious. Now it took me 5 or 6 times of doing this, reassembling my Wii and testing it before it would boot unsigned discs for me, I was definitely beginning to panic, so I didn't fit into the 'you can fit it in 10 minutes' category, however it did work in the end, perfectly well, so you may need to persevere to get good results.

    Conclusion : Generally pretty good. Once it worked, it worked very well, which is the main thing, I didn't destroy my Wii and if I ever want to remove it it'll be a breeze. There are some obvious down sides though – the fact that I had to try a few times before it would work shows that this kind of mod will never be as stable as a soldered chip- but if you can solder, you're not reading this review right? Also it is slightly pricey for what it is, particularly with no sites doing any kind of bundle packages at the moment.

    I guess overall if you're anything like me though, you want a modded Wii, you can't solder and don't know anyone else that can, you have a few Euros hanging around and are brave enough to open your Wii's case you could do a whole lot worse than picking one up. Especially with the Wii scene heating up!

    Please note that none of the "upgrade" products listed in this site are endorsed by Nintendo, Sony and/or Microsoft. DCEmu Reviews and DCEmu Network does not condone piracy. The primary functions of a "modchip" and/or "flashcart" are to allow you to play imported games and homebrew software that you legally own or simply just for experimenting with hardware. We in no way endorse piracy, and encourage all users to do the right thing and support the developers/manufacturers that support them. We do not take any responsibilities for any use outside of these parameters or where the use of such a device is illegal.
    by Published on February 2nd, 2011 00:23
    1. Categories:
    2. Nintendo Wii News,
    3. DCEmu Reviews
    Article Preview

    Wlip Solderless Wii Modkit
    Review by: souLLy
    Manufacturer: Wlip
    Site: N/A
    Price: 24.95€


    Overview: Wlip is an adaptor that has been designed especially to install any Modchip in your Wii in a faster and easy way and without damage for your console, because there is no need for welding. You can install it yourself without any technical procedure in a few minutes,

    There are two models of Wlip: Model A is used for normal leg Wiis and Model B works with cut leg Wiis. For D2C chips there are not any Wlip yet, but we are working on it. Wlip can support any Modchips models except the ones for D2C.

    Quality/Usability : I've wanted to get my Wii chipped for quite some time, the thought of some tasty Gamecube homebrew and the possibility of future Wii homebrew is a very tempting proposition. If you're like me and 99% of the population though that isn't too handy with a soldering iron, you're left with very little choice, send your beloved console along with a chunk of cash to some anonymous person who advertises on an Internet forum- not for the feint hearted, or buy a Wlip.

    A Wlip is a small plastic device that clips onto your Wii's motherboard that you can fit a Wii modchip into, essentially a Wii modchip that doesn't require any soldering! Not only that but if you decide you don't want to use that chip any more you can just as easily take the Wlip out of your console with the minimum of fuss or risk. On paper then it's a very enticing proposition. At the moment it's only for earlier model Wiis; people who need D2C chips are out of luck at the moment, the official Wlip site says they're on the way though so keep an eye out if you're interested.

    The modchip I chose was the Wiinja Deluxe, I grabbed mine from Futura Videogames which is an official reseller of the Wiinja chip so I could be certain it was genuine. At £23 including delivery it was fairly reasonable but be sure to hunt around for a good deal. To open your Wii you'll need a tri-wing screwdriver, I grabbed mine from DealExtreme for about 75p with free delivery, bargain!

    Installation : Take your Wlip and insert your modchip into the space provided, it should be a reassuringly snug fit. Next you need to disassemble your Wii. This was no great problem, there's a number of guides around that help you find where all the screws are hidden, after that it's a few screws inside and disconnecting two ribbon cables - if you're careful you can do all of this without doing any cosmetic damage to your case.

    Next firmly push your Wlip over a chip on the exposed Wii board, I watched the video on the official Wlip site to be certain it was in the right place, although it is obvious. Now it took me 5 or 6 times of doing this, reassembling my Wii and testing it before it would boot unsigned discs for me, I was definitely beginning to panic, so I didn't fit into the 'you can fit it in 10 minutes' category, however it did work in the end, perfectly well, so you may need to persevere to get good results.

    Conclusion : Generally pretty good. Once it worked, it worked very well, which is the main thing, I didn't destroy my Wii and if I ever want to remove it it'll be a breeze. There are some obvious down sides though – the fact that I had to try a few times before it would work shows that this kind of mod will never be as stable as a soldered chip- but if you can solder, you're not reading this review right? Also it is slightly pricey for what it is, particularly with no sites doing any kind of bundle packages at the moment.

    I guess overall if you're anything like me though, you want a modded Wii, you can't solder and don't know anyone else that can, you have a few Euros hanging around and are brave enough to open your Wii's case you could do a whole lot worse than picking one up. Especially with the Wii scene heating up!

    Please note that none of the "upgrade" products listed in this site are endorsed by Nintendo, Sony and/or Microsoft. DCEmu Reviews and DCEmu Network does not condone piracy. The primary functions of a "modchip" and/or "flashcart" are to allow you to play imported games and homebrew software that you legally own or simply just for experimenting with hardware. We in no way endorse piracy, and encourage all users to do the right thing and support the developers/manufacturers that support them. We do not take any responsibilities for any use outside of these parameters or where the use of such a device is illegal. ...
    by Published on January 1st, 2011 18:19
    1. Categories:
    2. Nintendo DS News,
    3. DCEmu Games Reviews

    So, quirky-fireworks-based-touch-screen-puzzle-shoot-em-ups then, not a genre that has overpopulated the DS to date, but Southpeak Games is set to change all that with their latest release; Big Bang Mini.

    The aim of the game is, unsurprisingly, to do your best not to get blown into thousands of little pieces. Using your touch-screen you direct your ship around; a seemingly simple task, but there's a twist, you must also use the stylus to shoot fireworks up to the top screen to dispatch the enemies. The trick then, is finding a good balance between attack and defence, under a flurry of bullets it can be hard enough just avoiding being blown up.

    What really makes Big Bang Mini stand out are the fantastic graphics and sense of humour; for those who've grown jaded from years of shooters with generic spaceships it's a real breath of fresh air. It's not unusual to defeat a crowd of floating clowns only to come up against a giant floating lizard (think the Pop and Twinbee series and you're somewhere on the way to knowing what to expect).

    Big Bang Mini boasts over 90 levels, a high-score challenge mode with online leaderboards, multiplay with a single cartridge and a raft of other unlockables- so there's plenty to keep even the most hardcore shooter fans busy.



    Stay tuned to DCEmu Games Reviews for a full review
    Big Bang Mini will be released exclusively on the Nintendo DS in Spring 2008
    by Published on January 1st, 2011 18:19
    1. Categories:
    2. Nintendo DS News,
    3. DCEmu Games Reviews



    Worms: Open Warfare 2
    Platform: Nintendo DS
    Publisher: THQ
    Developers: Two Tribes/Team17 Software
    Players: 1-4
    Released:
    US: September 4, 2007
    Europe: August 2007

    Buy from Amazon.co.uk
    Buy from Play-Asia

    What else can be said about Worms that hasn't been said before? It's one of those legendary games series that has been going as long as you can remember and has been ported to just about every console in the past 15 years. The basic idea behind the Worms games is two competing teams of worms take turns blowing each other up with bazookas, Uzis, dynamite, exploding sheep and other increasingly bizarre weaponry, until one of the teams is victorious; a seemingly simple concept that has really only been tweaked gently since its original conception. It's popularity came from the endless replayability of the game that came from the variety of weapons and landscapes that meant no one strategy would ever guarantee you a victory in a battle.

    The first outing of Worms on the DS was a slightly disappointing affair; it suffered from low-resolution sprites that flickered badly due to a buggy game engine. Some unfortunate enemy AI also meant that enemy worms would often blow themselves to pieces or stand around doing nothing until their turn was over. This was all a shame since Worms seemed like the perfect game for Nintendo's new handheld particularly during the drought of good software the DS was suffering from at the time.

    So it's with some caution we look at its sequel Worms: Open Warfare 2. The second installment of the series for the Nintendo DS and thankfully there's lots of reasons to feel positive about it's release, all of the criticism's aimed at the game engine seem to have been taken to heart and fixed. The game engine feels a lot more solid, the computer controlled enemies are a lot more intelligent (expect a thorough ass-kicking to start with) and overall everything seems a lot more polished than it's predecessor. The Worms games have never been a tour-de-force of graphical prowess but the chunky, colorful visuals are definitely likable enough- all of the usual dark humor is here and there's even a few slapstick cut scenes to raise a few smiles.

    What Team 17 have put together is a Greatest Hits style package of all the best bits from the previous games in the series, all of the better weapons over the years are here, the mission modes of the later games are here and enough extras around to keep seasoned Worms fans satisfied. The online modes are particularly impressive, random games or games against your friends (using the standard friend codes system), plus online leader boards (think Tony Hawk).



    With Worms games, as long as nothing upsets the game engine is solid and nothing is thrown into the mix to upset the balance then you're pretty much guaranteed good fun and Worms: Open Warfare 2 genuinely delivers. If you've never been a fan of the series previously, then it's unlikely you'll find anything to convince you otherwise here, it is what you expect, but perhaps the best version of what you expect.

    It's an excellent addition to any DS game collection, for replay value and instant pick-up-and-play....ability. Top marks to Team 17/Two Tribes for making the game it's predecessor only hinted at.

    Score: Very Good
    by Published on December 13th, 2008 22:26

    So, quirky-fireworks-based-touch-screen-puzzle-shoot-em-ups then, not a genre that has overpopulated the DS to date, but Southpeak Games is set to change all that with their latest release; Big Bang Mini.

    The aim of the game is, unsurprisingly, to do your best not to get blown into thousands of little pieces. Using your touch-screen you direct your ship around; a seemingly simple task, but there's a twist, you must also use the stylus to shoot fireworks up to the top screen to dispatch the enemies. The trick then, is finding a good balance between attack and defence, under a flurry of bullets it can be hard enough just avoiding being blown up.

    What really makes Big Bang Mini stand out are the fantastic graphics and sense of humour; for those who've grown jaded from years of shooters with generic spaceships it's a real breath of fresh air. It's not unusual to defeat a crowd of floating clowns only to come up against a giant floating lizard (think the Pop and Twinbee series and you're somewhere on the way to knowing what to expect).

    Big Bang Mini boasts over 90 levels, a high-score challenge mode with online leaderboards, multiplay with a single cartridge and a raft of other unlockables- so there's plenty to keep even the most hardcore shooter fans busy.



    Stay tuned to DCEmu Games Reviews for a full review
    Big Bang Mini will be released exclusively on the Nintendo DS in Spring 2008 ...
    by Published on September 5th, 2007 12:02



    Worms: Open Warfare 2
    Platform: Nintendo DS
    Publisher: THQ
    Developers: Two Tribes/Team17 Software
    Players: 1-4
    Released:
    US: September 4, 2007
    Europe: August 2007

    Buy from Amazon.co.uk
    Buy from Play-Asia

    What else can be said about Worms that hasn't been said before? It's one of those legendary games series that has been going as long as you can remember and has been ported to just about every console in the past 15 years. The basic idea behind the Worms games is two competing teams of worms take turns blowing each other up with bazookas, Uzis, dynamite, exploding sheep and other increasingly bizarre weaponry, until one of the teams is victorious; a seemingly simple concept that has really only been tweaked gently since its original conception. It's popularity came from the endless replayability of the game that came from the variety of weapons and landscapes that meant no one strategy would ever guarantee you a victory in a battle.

    The first outing of Worms on the DS was a slightly disappointing affair; it suffered from low-resolution sprites that flickered badly due to a buggy game engine. Some unfortunate enemy AI also meant that enemy worms would often blow themselves to pieces or stand around doing nothing until their turn was over. This was all a shame since Worms seemed like the perfect game for Nintendo's new handheld particularly during the drought of good software the DS was suffering from at the time.

    So it's with some caution we look at its sequel Worms: Open Warfare 2. The second installment of the series for the Nintendo DS and thankfully there's lots of reasons to feel positive about it's release, all of the criticism's aimed at the game engine seem to have been taken to heart and fixed. The game engine feels a lot more solid, the computer controlled enemies are a lot more intelligent (expect a thorough ass-kicking to start with) and overall everything seems a lot more polished than it's predecessor. The Worms games have never been a tour-de-force of graphical prowess but the chunky, colorful visuals are definitely likable enough- all of the usual dark humor is here and there's even a few slapstick cut scenes to raise a few smiles.

    What Team 17 have put together is a Greatest Hits style package of all the best bits from the previous games in the series, all of the better weapons over the years are here, the mission modes of the later games are here and enough extras around to keep seasoned Worms fans satisfied. The online modes are particularly impressive, random games or games against your friends (using the standard friend codes system), plus online leader boards (think Tony Hawk).



    With Worms games, as long as nothing upsets the game engine is solid and nothing is thrown into the mix to upset the balance then you're pretty much guaranteed good fun and Worms: Open Warfare 2 genuinely delivers. If you've never been a fan of the series previously, then it's unlikely you'll find anything to convince you otherwise here, it is what you expect, but perhaps the best version of what you expect.

    It's an excellent addition to any DS game collection, for replay value and instant pick-up-and-play....ability. Top marks to Team 17/Two Tribes for making the game it's predecessor only hinted at.

    Score: Very Good
    ...
    by Published on February 26th, 2007 21:52

    Lots of people have been confused about DLDI patching with homebrew DS software, hopefully this should clarify things a bit.

    The DLDI (Dynamically Linked Device Interface) was devised because there are so many different cards you can use to run homebrew software on and they all handle the way the software can access the files on the card differently. For a while developers were getting bogged down trying to get their code running on all of them properly, but with DLDI it keeps all this file accessing code seperate, so coders can concentrate on other features of the software. It also means more homebrew in the future is likely to run on your card of choice with few problems. Sounds like good news all round right?

    So how do you DLDI patch compatible software?

    Go to http://chishm.drunkencoders.com/DLDI/ and you'll see there are different methods for patching your nds files, for Windows users I strongly recommend DLDIRC (Win32 Right Click). If you are using a Mac/Linux you'll need to follow the instructions for them on the site.

    Using DLDIRC

    Install DLDIRC from the site and when it asks you which card you would like to use, select your card from the list.

    Now when you right-click an *.nds file it will offer you the option to DLDI patch it, do so then press a keyboard key when asked and it will patch the homebrew for your card.

    It's just the .nds file you need to patch, you don't need to patch individual ROMs if it's an emulator for example. Just copy the patched .nds and any other files it requires to run in the usual way.

    Remember: Not all homebrew software needs to be patched and not all homebrew is compatible with the DLDI, read the notes that accompany the software and it should give you a good idea of if you need to patch or not. ...
    by Published on October 4th, 2006 15:22

    The incredible story of the Gizmondo, complete with 200mph car crashes, the mafia, Busta Rhymes, millions of dollars and loaded magnums is being told over at Wired and is a must-read. Who knew the story behind the weak cousin to the GP2x was so exciting?



    Quote Originally Posted by Wired
    In the early 2000s, Gizmondo rose to prominence as the maker of a handheld gaming device designed to compete with Nintendo's DS and Sony's PlayStation Portable. The company touted its gadget as the next big thing in pocket electronics and, at one point, talked of moving half a million units in just a few months. But critics panned the device, and it failed to entice many customers. A month before Eriksson went off the road, Gizmondo declared bankruptcy, having hemorrhaged nearly $400 million in less than four years.

    It might have ended there, another high-flying company with big ambitions and a lousy product. But the crash put a spotlight on Eriksson and raised a series of questions: Who is he? What kind of person drives nearly 200 mph on a coastal highway? The answers led to even more puzzles. In just a few years, it seems, Eriksson went from languishing in a European jail cell to making millions as a tech executive to, even more improbably, becoming deputy commissioner of antiterrorism for an obscure Southern California transit police force. Before *Eriksson lost control of his Ferrari in Malibu, no one in the US really cared about his strange story. But after the supercar came apart, Eriksson would find every inch of his life under scrutiny by the LA County Sheriff's Department, federal law-enforcement officers, and the media. That's when Eriksson and a tangle of cohorts would find out just how large a little bump could loom...
    Full story:
    http://wired.com/wired/archive/14.10/gizmondo.html ...
    by Published on January 26th, 2006 11:55



    Nintendo have today announced the New DS Lite Console, heres some details thanks to Joystiq

    Nintendo President Satoru Iwata today announced Nintendo DS Lite, a slimmer version of the best-selling Nintendo DS™. Also featuring brighter screens, Nintendo DS Lite will launch in Japan in March. Nintendo DS Lite will be less than two-thirds the size of the original Nintendo DS and more than 20 percent lighter.

    Nintendo DS has enjoyed extremely strong sales in Japan and around the world, selling more than 14.4 million units worldwide. The Japanese sell-through of the existing Nintendo DS hardware exceeded 5 million within 13 months, which made Nintendo DS the fastest-selling video game system there.

    Nintendo will announce more information about the availability of Nintendo DS Lite in North America and other territories in the future.

    More details:

    Japanese release date: March 2, 2006

    Weight: 218g (compare to 275g for the current Nintendo DS)

    Dimensions: 133mm x 73.9mm x 21.5mm

    Screenshots via the comments: ...
    by Published on September 12th, 2005 23:26

    £14.99 and released 11/11/2005 says the play.com pre-order section

    http://play.com/play247.asp?page=com...page=2&ob=date

    nintendo have denied this was coming for a while, so seems a little odd. ...
    Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast